Update for Photon Fun

Figure 1: The Diminutive MCU on a 3 inch breadboard, color inverted

In my last blog post on this topic from over a year ago, I walked through the setup of a development environment for the Photon MCU board (a board made by Particle, a company which is not associated with this author or site in any way. I really like their MCU boards though!). Recently, I decided that the AMD-64, with its tether (in the form of a 110V power plug), its twenty pounds, and its voracious appetite for power, was a poor development machine for a 4 gram MCU board. OK – that was a (slight) under-exaggeration.

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A Blog that fit’s in the Pocket

A Very Tiny Blog
— (machine)

For awhile now, I’ve wanted a WordPress blog site I could take with me. I wanted to be able to put it in my pocket. Recently, I managed to do just that.

Being a lover of the unusual, I wanted the little blog machine, which would fit in my pocket, to use …

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The “Cheapo” Ammeter

cheapo-ammeter-002Figure 1: The “cheapo” ammeter for keeping tabs on SoC/SBC power usage.

I have a number of SoC/SBC based “homemade tablets” and “homemade server” boxes that consume anywhere from 300 mA to several amps at 5 VDC.  I wanted an easy way to check the power consumption under various load scenarios (GPU=on versus GPU=off, WiFi=on versus WiFi=off, eight cores versus four cores versus one core, etc).

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Temperature and Pressure Sensors

With the new Cirrus audio adapter up and running, I turned my attention to the temperature and barometric pressure sensor I had purchased for the “homemade” tablet.  The device, which measures less than an inch square, is the “BMP-180” and uses the I2C communication protocol. This is advantageous, as my UART is already permanently connected to the GPS board.

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A collection of SoC Projects

allmylittledroids7Figure 1: A growing Collection of little Soc/SBC powered computers (click to enlarge).

Today, when I visited my own site, I realized how confusing some of the projects may seem, because they reference different boards and things, and it’s a little bit of a jumble, and it’s hard to tell the players without a program.  Figure 1 should sort out some of the details.  There are two “homemade” tablets and two “homemade” servers at this point, all ARM CPU architecture powered, by SoC based SBC boards.

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Testing the Membrane Pad on the Pi2

firstmembranetest-frontface1Figure 1: Testing the membrane pad on the Pi2 powered “homemade” tablet.

The little pull-up board was mounted near the Pi2, so as to make the wires shorter.  It was mounted vertically, in that space between the enclosure’s connecting posts.  Then, I made the first test of the membrane pad, using the wiringPi gpio command to read all GPIO at once …

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SDR/Audio/Pi2

crammed-raspiriscytabletFigure 1: The “homemade tablet” is getting cramped. (Click to expand)

In figure 2, it can be seen that the little “homemade” tablet is getting quite cramped. Note that I did not mount the Cirrus card on the 40 pin IO connector of the Pi/2. This was to facilitate use of the GPIO pins for other things. There is also a vertical clearance problem to deal with. So, there will be individual wired female header lines coming from the audio board to the Pi/2 J8 connector (not yet in place).

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